My Nigga, You Don’t Wanna Hear The Truth

A Nigga Moment

Recent events have led me to touch on this topic. Many of you have seen the YouTube clip above regarding the hysteria surrounding the new Jordan’s that were released a few days ago. In addition, a reader of the site recently posted on Facebook that he was called a nerd and that his girlfriend should date a “real nigga” aka a thug. He was also questioned as to why he is a single 26 year old man without any children. I’m sure he is not alone in this ridiculousness. I too have been asked similar questions, like “How many kids do you have?” “You don’t smoke weed?” “Why you always reading books and sh*t? Real niggas don’t read.” etc.

Where does this faulty mindset come from? Why is it that it’s almost 2012 and we as a people are being held back not by white people, not by Republicans and the Tea Party, but by ourselves? It has been 300 years and yet we are still indoctrinated by the Willie Lynch Letter. I mean honestly, WTF is going on? There is something inherently wrong with our culture for glorifying ignorance and a lifestyle that is detrimental to the future of our people. Don’t let some of us try to better ourselves and our children, cause then we’re looked upon as sell outs and Uncle Toms, irregardless of the fact that we try to give back and help future generations get out of financial and mental poverty.

I saw an episode of Lockup on MSNBC a few weeks back and they were talking to this young black man, about 23 years old, who was arrested for armed robbery. Upon questioning him, he stated that he told the lady that he robbed that it was nothing personal, it was just business…

WTF?

At this point I all but screamed to my television, “Are you effin’ serious? Business? What business? Nigga, you robbed someone, there is no business in that.” But then I sat back and just watched how he acted, getting into fights in the jail, in and out of solitary confinement, multiple extensions to his jail time. A guard asked him why he attacked another prisoner and do you know what his reasoning was? “He called me a bitch.” Throughout the show, he didn’t seem to understand, in fact he seemed to relish physically being incarcerated at 23 and being “feared” by other inmates although he was probably no taller than 5’6″. He cracked jokes about being transferred to another prison and the only time he felt ashamed was when he had to take out his false teeth. The guard asked him why he was so upset, and he said “No 23 year old should have dentures. That’s embarrassing.” That made me think for a minute. This, unfortunately, is so true of our society. Most black folk are so caught up in their appearance that it leads to their downfall. Think about it, selling dope not to feed your starving child, but to be the first person to have the new Jordan’s. You wonder why niggas are so quick to fight and kill someone for stepping on their J’s or calling them a bitch. Well it’s pretty obvious, all they have are their possessions and their name. So when someone disrespects them by calling them a name or dirtying their shoes they see it as an attack on their manhood. They have no education to go on, so their respect is gained through fear and power. Hence why they feel the need to fight for what educated people deem as superficial entities.

Speaking of, there are a lot of highly educated African Americans in this country who also give back to the community and try to encourage future generations. There are a lot of great black husbands and fathers who provide, protect, and serve their family to the best of their abilities. There are a lot of beautiful black wives and mothers who support their husbands, work hard at their job, and then find time to take care of their families. There are a lot of African American teenagers who study hard, participate in multiple extra-curricular activities, and have goals other than those portrayed on BET. The problem is, how many of them do we actually see on television? How often do we see the negative side of our culture; the drugs, the violence, the ignorance on the news, rather than the positive side? How many of our children can recite a Lil’ Wayne song, but still aren’t able to read a book? We as a people cannot allow this to happen and then use the excuse that the white man is keeping us down. This apocryphal mentality is exactly what Willie Lynch intended 300 years ago. C’mon Son. We’re better than that. Let’s avoid being Another Naive Individual Glorifying Greed and Encouraging Racism.

What’s even more worrisome is the lack of encouragement in our community when someone is doing something right. Case in point, take what happened to the reader I mentioned at the beginning of this post. Why not encourage him and let him know that he’s doing the right thing? Tell him to keep his head up and stick with it as oppose to calling him a nerd. But, if he was hugging the block and in the trap all day, he would be ‘That Nigga’ that everyone knows, loves, and fears. Please. It’s been said plenty of times before, there is a reason why they call it the Trap and this hood mentality will leave you not as ‘That Nigga,’ but just another nigga, dead or in jail.

Sad thing is that niggas don’t wanna hear the truth. So the media will continue to lie to them and make it sound fly to them.

About Tha Doc

Like the tallest Redwood, you won’t be able to grow without both the sunshine and the rain...
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2 Responses to My Nigga, You Don’t Wanna Hear The Truth

  1. cmac says:

    Doc, you have said alot today…a number of thoughts came to mind as I read your note…the “Success and Plight” of the African American community, post-Willie Lynch, post-civil rights, and now some characterize–post-race: Obama era. Because of my schedule, I am not at liberty to truly explore the “Charge” that you set before us in this comment, but I wanted to say that I appreciate your honesty and sincerity. While I do not agree with all of your reflections concerning US, as a people, I believe that dialogue like this is where Liberation begins, expands, and transforms. ”Say It Plain, Say it Loud,” is a great book of speeches that reflects on our history and ties into several of your sentiments concerning the present state of African Americans. I look forward to your continued notes and observations that give my mind food for thought and further encourage education and self-awareness/reflection.

    • Tha Doc says:

      Why thank you. I really appreciate the comment. What you wrote is essentially what we want to achieve with this blog. By no means do I think that everything that I say or write is the gospel truth, just most of what I say/write is, lol just kidding! Seriously though, I just give my opinion to help spark conversation between all individuals regardless of education level, societal standing, political affiliation, race, etc. It helps us all to grow when we see other people’s point of view. I’ve heard of the book “Say It Plain, Say It Loud,” but haven’t read it yet. I will definitely place it on my Amazon wishlist. And may I add that I absolutely LOVE my people, flaws and all. I think that the struggle that we have gone through (and are currently still enduring) will make us better as a culture if only some of us would just WAKE UP and understand what is going on. Also thanks for being a frequent commenter to the blog!

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